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August 10

Wind Turbines are Reaching New Heights

The average height of wind turbines has been steadily increasing for some time now. In 2000, wind turbines reached an average height of 58m. Today, the average height of a wind turbine is 88m. This is caused by technological advancement within the industry, as reaching for new heights helps garner more energy. At higher altitudes, the air is denser, and the wind speeds are higher, which allows wind turbines to produce more energy. 

The math on wind turbines is simplebigger is better. Specifically, there are two ways to produce more power from the wind in each area. The first is with bigger rotors and blades to cover a wider area. That increases the capacity of the turbine, i.e., its total potential production. The second is to get the blades up higher into the atmosphere, where the wind blows more steadily. That increases the turbine’s “capacity factor,” i.e., the amount of power it produces relative to its total potential (or more colloquially: how often it runs).  

The average height of wind turbines has been steadily increasing for some time now. In 2000, wind turbines reached an average height of 58m. Today, the average height of a wind turbine is 88m. This is caused by technological advancement within the industry, as reaching for new heights helps garner more energy. At higher altitudes, the air is denser, and the wind speeds are higher, which allows wind turbines to produce more energy. 

The math on wind turbines is simplebigger is better. Specifically, there are two ways to produce more power from the wind in each area. The first is with bigger rotors and blades to cover a wider area. That increases the capacity of the turbine, i.e., its total potential production. The second is to get the blades up higher into the atmosphere, where the wind blows more steadily. That increases the turbine’s “capacity factor,” i.e., the amount of power it produces relative to its total potential (or more colloquially: how often it runs).  

The Biggest Wind Turbines in Canada

In 2015, San Francisco-based Pattern Energy Group Inc announced it would be installing 61 GE turbines at its Meikle wind project in British Columbia capable of generating between 2.75 and 3.2 megawatts of power. At 180 megawatts, Meikle would become be the largest wind project in the province at the time. The 2.75-megawatt turbine rots would be nearly 60 meters long, while the tower to hold the rotors would stand at 110 meters. That means the tip of the blades reached 170 meters high – or a little taller than the tower on Montreal’s Olympic Stadium. GE said in 2015 they were the biggest publicly planned wind turbines in the country. Taller turbines generally mean longer blades, and longer blades harvest more wind to create more energy. So, wind turbines have been reaching new heights in Canada for some time now.  

In 2015, San Francisco-based Pattern Energy Group Inc announced it would be installing 61 GE turbines at its Meikle wind project in British Columbia capable of generating between 2.75 and 3.2 megawatts of power. At 180 megawatts, Meikle would become be the largest wind project in the province at the time. The 2.75-megawatt turbine rots would be nearly 60 meters long, while the tower to hold the rotors would stand at 110 meters. That means the tip of the blades reached 170 meters high – or a little taller than the tower on Montreal’s Olympic Stadium. GE said in 2015 they were the biggest publicly planned wind turbines in the country. Taller turbines generally mean longer blades, and longer blades harvest more wind to create more energy. So, wind turbines have been reaching new heights in Canada for some time now.  

The Biggest Wind Turbines in the World

In 2018, GE announced the production of its new Haliade-X wind turbines. These would be the biggest wind turbines ever produced, standing at 260 meters in height. The blades would be 107 meters long each. These behemoths were designed to be used in the German North Sea.  Each would produce 12MWThey could power up to 1 million European households in a 750MW wind farm configuration. This massive wind turbine shows you how impressive wind energy can be. The important note is that these are offshore wind turbines, not on land. Offshore wind farms have become more popular in Europe and the UK in recent years but haven’t yet caught on as a trend in North America. The potential for growth and development of offshore wind farms in Canada is certainly real, and something to consider in future years.

In 2018, GE announced the production of its new Haliade-X wind turbines. These would be the biggest wind turbines ever produced, standing at 260 meters in height. The blades would be 107 meters long each. These behemoths were designed to be used in the German North Sea.  Each would produce 12MW. They could power up to 1 million European households in a 750MW wind farm configuration. This massive wind turbine shows you how impressive wind energy can be. The important note is that these are offshore wind turbines, not on land. Offshore wind farms have become more popular in Europe and the UK in recent years but haven’t yet caught on as a trend in North America. The potential for growth and development of offshore wind farms in Canada is certainly real, and something to consider in future years.

Wind energy is the fastest-growing source of renewable energy in Canada. As the industry grows and innovation continues, Naveco Power will bring these discoveries and integrate them into opportunities for New Brunswickers.

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New Brunswick's Contribution

In New Brunswick, Naveco Power is taking wind turbines to new heights with the Chaleur Ventus project in northern New Brunswick. Chaleur Ventus consists of only five turbines, at 179.5 m total wind energy converter (WEC) height. These turbines are taller than others constructed in the province due to the technological advances in the industry. Chaleur Ventus will provide 20MW of power, enough for nearly 9000 homes. This is just an example of how Naveco Power is taking wind turbines to new heights in NB, for the benefit of our residents and the environment.  

Innovation in wind energy is progressing at a rapid pace. Year in and year out science allows us to create and use taller, stronger towers to hold longer blades to make more energy. Wind energy is also the fastest-growing source of renewable energy in CanadaAs the industry grows and innovation continues, Naveco Power will bring these discoveries and integrate them into opportunities for New Brunswickers. Chaleur Ventus is just the first of what we hope to be many examples of Naveco Power doing just that. Naveco Power hopes to continue to bring renewable energy to New Brunswick, with wind energy as a cornerstone of that vision. Wind energy projects will bring good jobs to our region and a more environmentally friendly path forward for our energy production. That is precisely why Naveco Power wants to bring more wind turbines, to greater heights here in NB, with your support.  

  

Resources 

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/the-pros-and-cons-of-ultra-tall-wind-turbine-towers 

https://globalnews.ca/news/2157956/wind-turbines-reach-for-new-heights/ 

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=33912#:~:text=Since%202012%2C%20the%20average%20height,such%20as%20trees%20or%20buildings. 

https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/3/8/17084158/wind-turbine-power-energy-blades 

In New Brunswick, Naveco Power is taking wind turbines to new heights with the Chaleur Ventus project in northern New Brunswick. Chaleur Ventus consists of only five turbines, at 179.5 m total wind energy converter (WEC) height. These turbines are taller than others constructed in the province due to the technological advances in the industry. Chaleur Ventus will provide 20MW of power, enough for nearly 9000 homes. This is just an example of how Naveco Power is taking wind turbines to new heights in NB, for the benefit of our residents and the environment.  

Innovation in wind energy is progressing at a rapid pace. Year in and year out science allows us to create and use taller, stronger towers to hold longer blades to make more energy. Wind energy is also the fastest-growing source of renewable energy in CanadaAs the industry grows and innovation continues, Naveco Power will bring these discoveries and integrate them into opportunities for New Brunswickers. Chaleur Ventus is just the first of what we hope to be many examples of Naveco Power doing just that. Naveco Power hopes to continue to bring renewable energy to New Brunswick, with wind energy as a cornerstone of that vision. Wind energy projects will bring good jobs to our region and a more environmentally friendly path forward for our energy production. That is precisely why Naveco Power wants to bring more wind turbines, to greater heights here in NB, with your support.  

  

Resources 

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/the-pros-and-cons-of-ultra-tall-wind-turbine-towers 

https://globalnews.ca/news/2157956/wind-turbines-reach-for-new-heights/ 

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=33912#:~:text=Since%202012%2C%20the%20average%20height,such%20as%20trees%20or%20buildings. 

https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/3/8/17084158/wind-turbine-power-energy-blades 

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